Manual Lymph Drainage Effects (MLD®)

If MLD is applied correctly, it has a profound yet subtle effect on the body. To achieve this, a therapist has to be correctly trained, fully focused and attentive to the precision of the technique as well as to the needs of the patient.

MLD affects the nervous system by lowering sympathetic tonus, as demonstrated by Hutzschenreuter in Germany (Bibliography). In so doing, MLD can have an effect on smooth muscles innervated by the sympathetic system, for example in blood and lymph vessels as well as intestinal motility. It can also help a patient to recuperate from chronic illness by allowing their parasympathetic nervous system to predominate. MLD is calming and relaxing to receive and patients often feel a sense of well-being after treatment.

Through the pumping and stretching effect on the lymph vessels, the Dr. Vodder method of Manual Lymph Drainage stimulates the contraction of smooth muscles in lymph vessels, helping to move the lymph forward and drain the connective tissue.

Fluid movement in the connective tissue (interstitial fluid) as well as the movement of lymph is assisted with a correctly performed MLD. By stimulating microcirculation and lymph vessel motility, MLD can be successfully employed in edematous conditions, such as lymphedema and certain types of venous edema.

Indirectly it may also affect the immune system. By assisting lymph flow, MLD is thought to bring pathogens quicker to the lymph nodes where they can be neutralized.

By training your hands correctly, we give you the best possible advantage in treating a diverse population of patients.


Before treatment with MLD

Before treatment with MLD

After treatment with MLD

After treatment with MLD

Kathleen McLoughlin, PT